Site Accessibility Statement
Wilfrid Laurier University Faculty of Arts
April 24, 2014
 
 
Canadian Excellence

100-level Courses, 2013-14



Note 1: First-year students may choose ONLY 100-level Film courses.

Note 2: For large lectures with tutorials, students must register for a lecture, one tutorial, and one screening. All tutorials begin in Week 2.

Note 3: The Department cannot add students into full courses even if they are needed to fulfill graduation requirements. It is the student’s responsibility to put themselves on course waitlists as early in the Spring registration period as possible.

Note 4: Students who arrive at the beginning of term without having made any course selections will be advised to add themselves into open courses and onto the waitlist of closed courses, even if that means they don't acquire all of the English courses they'd planned to take.

Warnings

The university reserves the right to remove you at any time from any courses that you have registered for contrary to the regulations. For example, if you register in more courses than allowed, in courses for which you have exclusions, in courses for which you lack prerequisites or in courses which are inappropriate due to any other university regulation, the university reserves the right to remove you even after classes have begun. Nevertheless, it is your responsibility to make the appropriate selections. The university does not guarantee that your errors will be caught.

Course

Number

Title

Term

Day / Time

CRN

Instructor

101

Film & Narrative

W

Lecture: TR 1:00-2:20

2600

Dr. J.J. Chang

Screening: W 7:00-9:50

2601

This course introduces students to the study of film in relation to narrative. In particular, we will examine how basic elements of film style such as cinematography, mise-en-scène, editing and sound contribute to the construction of plot, characterization and narration. We will explore the use of narrative in a variety of modes, including classical Hollywood cinema, European art cinema, and documentary film. After taking the course, students will acquire the critical vocabulary with which to write about and discuss films.


102

Film and the Image

W

Lecture: T 12:30-2:20

3678

Dr. R. Kilbourn

Screening 1:  M 7:00 - 9:50

Screening 2:  T 7:00 - 9:50

3679

3691

An introduction to the analysis of the film image, with emphasis on the role of visual style (mise-en-scène, editing, cinematography) in relation to cinema's various historical, cultural and technological contexts. Through the lens of the filmic image, in all its dimensions, this course considers the hegemonic status of visual representation over other modes – how visuality forms the basis for the identities and other cultural forms characteristic of the modern and postmodern periods under capitalism. Areas and topics of focus include: mise-en-scene; the photographic image; cinematography (the shot); continuity editing; classical realism; the art film; the representation of gender (esp. masculinity); the mass media (e.g. video games); animation; digital cinematography; intensified continuity; transnational cinema; cinema and/as memory; commodification and consumerism; intertextuality; etc.


Tut 1

W 5:30-6:20

3681



Tut 2

W 6:30-7:20

3682



Tut 3

W 7:30-8:20

3683



Tut 4

W 8:30-9:20

3684



Tut 5

W 3:30-4:20

3685



Tut 6

W 4:00-4:50

3686



Tut 7

W 4:30-5:20

3687



Tut 8

W 5:00-5:50

3688



Tut 9

W 5:30-6:20

3689



Tut 10

W 6:00-6:50

3690



103

Film and Genre

F

Lecture: R 12:30-2:20

2848

Dr. S. Annett

Screening 1: F 2:30-5:20

2849

Screening 2: R 7:00-9:50

2850

The aim of FS103: Film and Genre is to introduce students to the study of film through film genres. Along with an introduction to general elements of filmmaking (cinematography, mise-en-scène, editing, and sound) and film analysis (film narrative, characters, and themes), we will explore the question: "what is film genre?" We assume that films belong to a genre if they have similar narratives, structures, settings, conventions and/or characters; e.g., a film with aliens and advanced technology set in outer space is most likely science fiction. And yet, while audiences often like to see the same kind of film over and over again, they do not want to see the exact same film. Innovation and change are as much a part of genre film as familiar conventions. Genre hybridity (blending conventions) and parody (sending up established conventions) have become widespread practices in order to make genre films fresh and appealing to audiences. This is especially true in the age of digital cinema, as seen in recent films such as Chronicle (2012), which uses "found footage," science fiction, family drama, and darkly parodic superhero elements in a digital format. In this course, we will explore the social, historical, economic, and technological contexts that shape the various trends in genres. While this course explores classical and postclassical Hollywood genre film—e.g., the musical, film noir, horror, and "smart films"—it also considers some international genres, such as the martial arts film.


Tut 1

W 2:30-3:20

2851



Tut 2

W 2:30-3:20

2852



Tut 3

W 3:30-4:20

2853



Tut 4

W 3:30-4:20

2854



Tut 5

W 4:30-5:20

2855



Tut 6

W 4:30-5:20

2856



Tut 7

W 5:30-6:20

2857



Tut 8

W 5:30-6:20

2858



Tut 9

W 6:30-7:20

2859



Tut 10

W 6:30-7:20

2860