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Wilfrid Laurier University Leaf
July 24, 2014
 
 
Canadian Excellence

Dr. Nick Coady

Dean, Faculty of Social Work

Contact Information
Email: ncoady@wlu.ca
Phone: 519-884-0710 ext.5252
Fax: 519-725-1453
Office Location: FSW-421

Languages Spoken

English

Academic Background
Ph.D.:    University of Toronto (1990)
MSW:    Wilfrid Laurier University (1982)
BA:        York University (1977)
Biography

Until becoming dean of the FSW in 2011, Nick taught in the individuals, families, and groups field of study. His teaching and research interests include relationship and other common factors in counselling, artistic/intuitive elements in counselling, the eclectic use of theory in practice, and basic communication and counselling skills. His practice experience has included individual and family work with multi-problem adolescents, group work with violent men, and general family service counselling. Nick's recent research and publications have focused on good worker-client relationships in child welfare and of men's experiences of child welfare involvement. He is currently working on the 3rd edition of a co-edited textbook on the eclectic use of theory in direct social work practice.

Selected Publications:

Edited Books:

Coady, N., & Lehmann, P. (Eds.) (2008). Theoretical perspectives for direct social work practice: A generalist-eclectic approach (2nd ed.). New York: Springer.

Cameron, G., Coady, N., & Adams, G. (Eds.) (2007). Toward positive systems of child and family welfare: Current issues and future directions. Waterloo, ON: Wilfrid Laurier Press. 

Journal Articles and Book Chapters:

Coady, N. & Lehmann, P.  (2008).  An overview of and rationale for a generalist-eclectic approach to direct social work practice. In N. Coady & P. Lehmann (Eds.), Theoretical perspectives for direct social work practice: A generalist-eclectic approach (2nd ed.; pp. 3-39). New York: Springer.

Coady, N.  (2008).  The science and art of direct practice: An overview of theory and of an intuitive-inductive approach to practice. In N. Coady & P. Lehmann (Eds.), Theoretical perspectives for direct social work practice: A generalist-eclectic approach (2nd ed.; pp. 41-66). New York: Springer.

Coady, N. & Lehmann, P.  (2008). The problem-solving model: A framework for integrating the science and art of practice. In N. Coady & P. Lehmann (Eds.), Theoretical perspectives for direct social work practice: A generalist-eclectic approach (2nd ed.; pp. 67-86). New York: Springer.

Coady, N. & Lehmann, P.  (2008). Revisiting the generalist-eclectic approach. In N. Coady & P. Lehmann (Eds.), Theoretical perspectives for direct social work practice: A generalist-eclectic approach (2nd ed.; pp. 523-540). New York: Springer.

Fine, M., Palmer, S., & Coady, N. (2007). Service participant voices in child welfare, children's mental health, and psychotherapy. In G. Cameron, N. Coady, & G. Adams (Eds.), Towards positive systems of child and family welfare: Current issues and future directions (pp. 187-247). Waterloo, ON: Wilfrid Laurier Press.

Coady, N., Cameron, G., & Adams, B. (2007). Fundamental considerations for child and family welfare. In G. Cameron, N. Coady, & G. Adams (Eds.), Towards positive systems of child and family welfare: Current issues and future directions (pp. 347-371). Waterloo, ON: Wilfrid Laurier Press.

Hill, G., & Coady, N. (2003). Comparing Euro-Western counselling and Aboriginal healing methods: An argument for the effectiveness of Aboriginal approaches to healing. Native Social Work Journal, 5, 44-63.

Coady, N.F.  (2002, 1999).  The helping relationship. In F. J. Turner (Ed.), Social work practice: A Canadian perspective (pp. 58-72). Scarborough, ON: Prentice-Hall.

Coady, N.F., Rothery, M., & Dennis, D. (1999). A multi-year evaluation of a parent support centre. Canadian Journal of Community Mental Health, 18, 33-45.

Stalker, C.A., Levene, J.E., & Coady, N.F.  (1999). Solution focused brief therapy--One model fits all?  Families in Society, 80, 468-477.

Wolgien, C. S., & Coady, N. F. (1997). Good therapists' beliefs about the development of their helping ability: The Wounded Healer paradigm revisited. The Clinical Supervisor, 15(2), 19-35.

Coady, N.F., & Wolgien, C.S.  (1996).  Good therapists views of how they are helpful. Clinical Social Work Journal, 24, 311-322.


Selected Research Projects:

1999-2007: Member of the research team for the SSHRC funded Community-University Research Alliance (CURA) project (principle investigator: Dr. Gary Cameron). This research project was a collaborative venture between university researchers and a number of local child welfare and children’s mental health agencies. Nick was (a) principle investigator for a study of the daily living realities and service experiences of families with children with complex mental health problems, (b) co-principle investigator (with Dr. Catherine de Boer) for a study of good helping relationships in child welfare, and (c) co-principle investigator (with Dr. Gary Cameron) for a study of the daily living realities and service experiences of men involved with child welfare.

1995-1998: Conducted a 2 year evaluation of the Reconnecting Youth Project--a multi-agency, family preservation service model for adolescents and their families. Co-principal investigator with Ms. Karen Hayward; funded by the Catholic Children's Aid Society of Metropolitan Toronto Centre, through the Centre for Social Welfare Studies, Wilfrid Laurier University.

1992-1997: Conducted a four year program evaluation of the Edmonton Family Centre's Parent Support Centre Project, which represented an innovative approach to providing social services to low-income families in high-needs neighbourhoods. Co-principal investigator with Dr. Michael Rothery (University of Calgary); funded by the Muttart Foundation (a private charitable foundation).

1993-1996: Conducted a program evaluation of the Calgary YWCA's "Ending the Cycle of Men's Violence" group treatment program. Co-principal investigator with Ms. Melanie Johansson and Ms. Janet Wagar; funded partially by the Calgary YWCA and a short-term research grant from Wilfrid Laurier University.